Delve into Japanese lesbian manga with new book “The Introduction to the World of Yuri”

New book introduces 140 titles from the yuri genre that explore the topic of lesbian love.

While a lot has been written about the “Boys’ Love” subgenre of male homosexual romance that’s often depicted in manga and anime, and even explored in a South Park episode, the corresponding subgenre of “Girls’ Love” is often left unexplored by comparison. Known as “Yuri”, which literally translates to “Lily”, this category of manga revolves around romantic and erotic female-female relationships, and is usually written for female readers. It’s unusual name can be traced back to the male chief editor of Barazoku (“The Clan of the Rose”), Japan’s first magazine geared towards gay men, who is believed to have first used the word “Yuri” to describe lesbian love in 1976, saying that if “Bara” or “Rose” was being used to describe his male gay clan of readers, the word “Lily” would be a fitting term for a corresponding female gay clan.

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While the yuri subgenre has a dedicated fanbase both in Japan and abroad, one Japanese publisher aims to demystify the genre for both avid readers and newcomers to the scene with a new book called Yuri no Sekai Nyuumon or The Introduction to the World of Yuri.

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The book introduces more than 140 works that belong to the yuri genre, along with manga recommendations from notable authors, and a feature that reveals the best book covers from yuri manga, as chosen by popular voice actress Izumi Kitta.

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There’s even an “event report” on a recent exhibition dedicated to works related to the topic of Girls’ Love in modern art and photography.

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Whether you’re an avid reader of yuri manga or looking to find out more about the subject, this 128-page book covers all the basics with a large collection of beautiful images.

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Published by Genkosha, The Introduction to the World of Yuri was recently released on 18 October, and retails for 1,500 yen each at bookstores around the country.

Rocketnews 24 edited by JWS

Cuter than cute, Hatsune Miku underwear!

Japan’s fashion retailer Super Groupies, famous for its anime and manga inspired fashion articles, has found inspiration in virtual  pop vocalist Hatsune Miku.

They will release two pieces; a lingerie set consisting of  a bra and knickers in the trademark  aquamarine (blueish green, or greenish blue…) adorned with a bright pink ribbon.

Hatsune Miku model lingerie set

The second piece is a camisole, which is something Miku would wear on a lazy day at home while eating a cake….

Hatsune Miku model camisole

 

The lingerie set retails for 8.800 yen and the camisole goes for 8,500 yen.

Pre-order started yesterday and will continue untill November 6 (October 17, 2016 – November 6, 2016 ) with delivery scheduled for mid March.

You don’t have to love Hatsune Miku to appreciate these sets, they are lovely and reasonably priced….if you’re a Miku fan though, than this a no-brainer!

source:Super Groupies

Tomoko Hirano JWS

Evangelion kimono combine modern and traditional Japanese beauty

Survey being held to determine which of six different furisode designs will go into production.

Next month will mark four years since the theatrical release of Evangelion: 3.0 You Can (Not) Redo, the third of the four theatrical features that compose the Rebuild of Evangelion, a mysterious remake and/or sequel to the giant robot anime TV series and associated movies from the late 1990s. Creator and director Hideaki Anno recently apologized to fans for the delay in bringing Rebuild’s finale to theaters, but offered no timetable as to when it’ll be finished, and so the waiting continues.

With no new animation being released, Evangelion has taken a break from obfuscating to flex its muscles in its other areas of expertise: marketing and merchandising. During the wait for the fourth Rebuild film, we’ve seen Evangelion cheeseburgers, lingerie, and bullet trains. Seriously, what’s next? Evangelion kimono?

Precisely.

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Tokyo Otaku Mode’s latest fashionable endeavor is the Evangelion Full Graphic Kimono. The striking fabric patterns were prepared by Niigata Prefecture-based digital print company Digina, and features Evangelon’s core cast on technologically inspired fields in the hues of their respective image colors.

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This particular style of kimono, with long-flowing sleeves, is called furisode, and is predominantly worn by young women. In contrast to futuristic Digina, the garments’ sewing will be handled by Assistar, a Hiroshima kimono tailor founded more than 70 years ago.

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Such craftsmanship doesn’t come cheap, and the Evangelion kimono, with a limited run of 100 units, are expected to retail in the neighborhood of 200,000 yen (US$1,940), a similar price point to non-anime-themed high-end kimono.

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Tokyo Otaku Mode has yet to officially decide which designs will go into production, and is taking a survey on its website to help it make the selection. The survey can be found here, so even if you’re not in a position to buy one of these wearable pieces of anime art, you can still help choose which ones come into existence.

Source, images: Tokyo Otaku Mode

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First fake food hairwear, now footwear!

Passers-by will be salivating over your delicious-looking footwear.

One of the most enticing things about eating out in Japan is the chance to gaze upon stunning food replicas in restaurant display windows, which show exactly what they have on offer, in beautifully recreated plastic form. The food samples are so popular that small versions can be purchased at specialty shops as souvenirs, but for those who want to add some delicacies to their wardrobe, Japanese retailer Fake Food Hatanaka is the place to go.

▼ Fancy a décolletage dripping with delectable citrus? This store has you covered.

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Fake Food Hatanaka first wowed us back in 2013 with their head-turning range of jewellery and headbands, which caused a sensation online again this year with some more snazzy updates. While a browse through their collection turns up some curious products, some of their showstoppers can be found in the company’s footwear department, with two pairs of boots that look so refreshingly delicious we don’t know whether we want to wear them or bite into them!

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The “Orange Cake Short Boots” retail for 10,800 yen (US$104), which is not a bad price, considering that most of the restaurant-style food replicas retail for 10,000 yen each.

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The juicy-looking sliced oranges have been carefully arranged around each boot to enhance the realism and give them an aesthetically pleasing finish.

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▼ The long Orange Cake Boots retail for 28,000 yen.

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This design features an extra serving of delicious orange slices, with the base colour resembling a warm, cooked cake surface.

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▼ It’s the perfect way to brighten up a dreary, rainy day!

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Although with fruit as realistic as this, you might want to keep some oranges nearby to stop yourself from licking your boots!

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If you want to add some zest to your shoe collection, head over to the Fake Food Hatanaka store, where the boots can be ordered online for shipping around the world. While you’re there, you might want to check out all their other amazing products, like drinks, sweets, and sandwiches too!

Source: Fake Food Hatanaka

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Love Japan’s realistic fake food? Now you can wear it on your head as an accessory!

No one wants to have egg on their face, but if you want in on your head, this Japanese company is happy to oblige.

One of the many great things about eating out in Japan is the fake food samples that are presented outside the restaurant. Sometimes it can be hard to tell what a dish will actually look like from a written menu, so they’re super helpful for helping you decide if a restaurant is right for you before you even go inside.

So… pretty….
Oh right, I was supposed to be picking my dinner!

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Some of the fake food samples are really beautifully made, so much so that you may have thought about stealing them and wearing them on your head… maybe.

But now you don’t have to live a life of plastic-sample-stealing crime to get that food fashion you crave so badly. One of the companies that makes the realistic fake food for restaurants, Fake Food Hatanaka, has now released what it calls the ii-Fake line of accessories that feature their signature plastic dishes.

Here’s a sample of some of their wares:

▼ Nothing quite completes that “I woke up like this” look
like a pile of spaghetti and meat sauce in your hair.

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▼ “Oh this old thing? I just tossed it up there this morning.”

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▼ The egg on that tsukimi soba really brings out the yolks in your eyes.

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▼ When you want to have emo hair but also
want to show your love of bacon and eggs to the world.

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▼ One of my favorites for its subtlety: a bacon bow.

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▼ And for those who want the complete
opposite of subtlety: the full-on Medusa-hair omelet soba!

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If you’re a fan of Japanese food samples and crazy hair accessories, then check out Fake Food Hatanaka’s online accessory shop ii-fake. There’s much more available than what we’ve shown here, though a lot of it has been so popular it’s already sold out.

 

Source: Fake Food Hatanaka

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Limited haori inspired coats are back!

No I’m not going to insult your intelligence by calling these “samurai coats”, it would only cheapen an otherwise high quality products in my opinion, no these coats are based on the kimono men wear called haori,  haori  are nowadays only worn during festivities like weddings and coming of age day (the day 21 year old youngsters celebrate their entrance into the “adult” world).

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The men’s kimono is one stylish piece of clothing though, worthy to be worn much more often than just once a year or less. Wearing a hoari on an ordinary day would give you a lot of puzzled looks, kind of like wearing a swimsuit during winter.

Fashion brand Trove introduced last year the Haori “wa-robe” with wa (和)meaning  Japanese style, and it proved to be a very successful concept. selling out in a short time.

This year, the lineup has been expanded to four different pieces, with the warmest being the 29,700-yen (US$288) Wool Haori, with a soft-to-the-touch wool/nylon/polyurethane shell and cupra rayon lining.

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While the haori is an old-school garment, the simple, understated design means that they can be paired just as easily with modern fashion as they can traditional Japanese clothing.

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Made of waffle-patterned cotton instead of wool, though with the same lining as the Wool Haori, this ivory-colored coat is also priced at 29,700 yen.

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Trove is now also offering wool hakama, the loose-fitting pants.hc-9

The 24,840-yen Wool Hakama feature the same wool/nylon/polyurethane material and colors as the Wool Haori.

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The entire lineup can be ordered here through Trove’s website, with special instructions for overseas customers found here or use the form below. Shipping is scheduled for early December.

Source: Japaaan

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Limited Whiskey Pocky is the latest “must have” snack from Japan.

Like any finger food that’s covered in chocolate, Pocky is incredibly popular with kids. But being sweet without crossing over into cloying means grown-ups too can appreciate the crisp chocolate-coated pretzel sticks, so much so that it’s not uncommon to see Pocky served along with alcoholic drinks at adult parties or bars.

So it’s a natural progression for Glico, the makers of Pocky, to create a special version that’s designed specifically to be enjoyed with a stiff drink, which is how Adult Amber (“Otona no Kohaku” in Japanese) Pocky came about. Specifically, Adult Amber Pocky is to be enjoyed with a glass of whiskey. That makes it arguably even more old-school masculine than the sporadically offered Men’s Pocky, which features a less sweet variety of chocolate than the standard version. Similarly, Glico describes the chocolate used in the Adult Amber as rich and bitter, and also featuring the distinct aroma of whiskey.

But the deepest connection to whiskey is found in the dough used for the pretzel stick, which contains malt extract. Before being coated in chocolate, the stick is sprinkled with salt, with the resulting combination of flavors said to deliciously complement the grain alcohol you’re sipping.

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This is actually Glico’s second time to offer the snack, as Adult Amber Whiskey was briefly available last November, before quickly selling out on Amazon’s Japanese site. This year, the company has prepared 300,000 boxes, which will once again be sold exclusively through Amazon, priced at 998 yen (US$9.70) for six packs shipped inside a round container styled after those used for packaging whiskey bottles. Adult Amber Pocky officially goes on sale October 25, and can be ordered domestically here (Which can be done risk-free by us).

Source: IT Media
Images: Pocky official website

Rocketnews 24 edited by JWS